Friday, January 19, 2018

Angry Reader of the Week: Beth (Bich Minh) Nguyen

"...It would be easier to list what doesn't make me angry."



Hello everybody! You know what time it is. It's time to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Beth Nguyen.

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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

They Call Us Bruce - Episode 32: They Call Us Tiffany Chin

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.



What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. Each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

On this episode, we welcome champion figure skater, former Olympian and coach Tiffany Chin. We talk about Tiffany's journey to becoming, as Jeff puts it, "The First Great Asian American Hope" of skating, the changing state of the sport, and why so many Asian Americans are now excelling on the ice.

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Monday, January 15, 2018

Trump wanted the "Pretty Korean Lady" to negotiate with North Korea

Donald Trump had a "Where Are You From?" moment with a Korean American intelligence analyst.



By now, you've heard about Donald Trump's recent remarks describing Haiti, El Salvador and African nations as "shithole countries." And by now, none of this should surprise you. Given the consistent, overwhelming evidence of Trump's ridiculous inability to grasp anything beyond his own wealthy white male entitlement, we passed the point of surprise a long time ago. If you're surprised, it's on you.

And so, here is another entry into the long log of Trump's unsurprising racism and sexism. Amid the "shithole" backlash, NBC News reports on a previous exchange, in which Trump asked an Asian American intelligence analyst about where her "people" are from, then referred to her as a "pretty Korean lady," and suggested that she should be involved with his administration's talks with North Korea.

Yup. Trump pulled a "Where are you from?"

It's an annoying, perpetual line of questioning that some of us Asian Americans are way too familiar with. In this case, it came from the President of the United States, but it ran its predictable course like a steady river.

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Sunday, January 14, 2018

Read These Blogs


Say the words as plainly as Trump does: "There is no logical interpretation of Trump's words other than as an assertion of white supremacist purpose, in which he explicitly states what has been the implied core mission of Trumpism all along: To Make America White Again... All of this is why it's important for news audiences to hear another word in association with Trump: 'Racist.'"

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White Identity Politics, Failsons, and Being the First Asian American Woman Playwright On Broadway: An Interview with Young Jean Lee Young Jean Lee’s play, Straight White Men, delves into white identity politics. Her play will make its Broadway debut in June.

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January Nonfiction: "The Birthday Banquet" by Jaime Woo "I think of my grandmother sometimes and wonder what hypothetical good it would do to come out to her at this point. "It’d probably kill her," my partner says. The truth is that I am not ready for another version of my grandmother, one who might reject me, just as she is not ready for another version of me."

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Father's sacrifice helps Kim become snowboard star: Chloe Kim has the chance to become the youngest female snowboarder to win Olympic gold when the 2018 Pyeongchang Games kick off in South Korea next month and the American teen says she owes much of her success to her dedicated dad.

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How The Last Jedi's Rose Changed When Kelly Marie Tran Was Cast: Star Wars: The Last Jedi director Rian Johnson says the character of Rose Tico fundamentally changed when Kelly Marie Tran was cast.

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Locally Produced MeSseD Dives Beneath the Sewer Grates: Jay B. Kalagayan's comic books series MeSseD follows the life and times of Filipino sewer worker Lilliput and her coworkers as they use science to battle whatever's waiting for them in the darkness.


Friday, January 12, 2018

Angry Reader of the Week: Eugene Cordero

"I play pretend."



Hello, good readers! It's that time again. Time to meet the Angry Reader of the Week, spotlighting you, the very special readers of this website. Over the years, I've been able to connect with a lot of cool folks, and this is a way of showing some appreciation and attention to the people who help make this blog what it is. This week's Angry Reader is Eugene Cordero.

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Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Same-sex couples should consider a marital agreement

A lot of same-sex couples who had been together for a long time celebrated the Supreme Court's declaration that gay marriage was legal by doing what a lot of other couples in love have done. They eloped.

While they probably didn't sneak out of their parents' houses in order to do it, many did marry suddenly without a big ceremony. They may have done so without a lot of thought about what it meant for their future finances in the event of either death or divorce.

Fortunately, it isn't too late. Whether you are a same-sex couple that has already tied the knot or one that's getting ready to do so, a marriage agreement can make the future a lot smoother. The only difference between agreements made before or after a marriage is whether they're called "premarital" or "post-marital." They accomplish essentially the same things.

Here are things that you and your spouse or spouse-to-be need to consider.

1. Each of you needs to have your own attorney look over any agreement that you devise. Even if you are in complete accord, having your own attorney read through the paperwork and offer any advice about shortcomings or potential alterations is wise. That way no one can ever say that you or your spouse lacked sufficient understanding of the agreement when you signed it.

2. An agreement is designed to protect your assets when your marriage ends. If it ends in divorce, you both may have property or assets that you brought into the relationship that you want to protect. Keep in mind that, if you have children, the agreement cannot dictate issues like child support or custody. That is under the control of the state and cannot be dictated by private agreements. The court is obligated to protect the child's interests, not yours.

3. You can, however, agree that a child that you have will inherit wealth that you wouldn't necessarily want to see go to your spouse if you split up or die. For example, if you inherit the family farm that's been in your family for generations, your agreement can stipulate that the inheritance bypasses your spouse even if you die and goes to your child. That could be important if your spouse has other potential heirs, like children from a previous marriage.

For more advice on what a marital agreement can do for you, consider seeking an attorney's advice as soon as possible.

Monday, January 8, 2018

Look at these All-American skaters going to the Olympics

Karen Chen, Mirai Nagasu, Nathan Chen, Vincent Zhou, and Maia and Alex Shibutani.



Look at all those all-American faces on the podium at the 2018 U.S. Figure Skating Championship! And by all-American, I mean Asian American, set to represent the U.S. next month at the Winter Olympics.

Team USA's 2018 Winter Olympics Figure Skating Lineup Has Been Announced

The U.S. will send three ladies, three men, three ice dance and one pairs team to compete in Pyeongchang, South Korea. For the interests of this blog, skating on behalf of Team Asian America are Karen Chen, Mirai Nagasu, Nathan Chen, Vincent Zhou, and Maia and Alex Shibutani.

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